Re: Moe (voornamelijk in het gezicht)

Forum Forums Vragen over voeding en gezondheid Moe (voornamelijk in het gezicht) Re: Moe (voornamelijk in het gezicht)

#50890

Anoniem

@ Ikke,

de reden waarom de auteur van de site ( iThyroid.com)waar ik die studie op heb gevonden deze had vermeld is omdat er ook studies zijn gedaan die aantonen dat er een serieus gebrek is aan kalium (potassium) in de hyperthyroid toestand. Vandaar de vermelding van het onderzoek over zoethout dat tot kalium gebrek leidt en daarom in verband kan gebracht worden met schildklier problemen.

Quote van de site:

“Studies show that potassium becomes very deficient in the hyperthyroid state. It can become so deficient that hypokalemic paralysis results. This is a condition in which the whole body becomes rigid because of potassium deficiency. There are reports in the literature of people found in a state of hypokalemic paralysis in the street. When they are taken to the hospital and revived with potassium infusions, they are often found to have hyperthyroidism. For an unknown reason this occurs at a higher rate among Asians. It may be genetic or dietetic (high sodium intake from soy sauce, perhaps??). There are indications that potassium deficiency may also be involved in hyperthyroidism and the rapid weight gain of hypos may be the result of potassium deficiency.

The four minerals, sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium are next to each other in the Periodic Table and form a square on the left side. There are strong interactions between these four minerals. The balances between these four minerals seems to be critical to health and are probably very critical for thyroid health. Excess amounts or deficiencies of any one of the four may severely disrupt thyroid function. Additionally there seem to be interactions between these four minerals and copper and zinc, which are two metallic minerals with critical thyroid functions. It seems that a copper deficiency interferes with the proper functioning of both potassium and magnesium, and zinc seems more related to sodium and calcium metabolism. Also all of these minerals seem involved in either the production, degradation, or cellular response to thyroid hormone.

Potassium, sodium, and lithium are alkaline minerals which are involved in the cellular pumps which regulate the transport of water and nutrients through the cell walls. There is evidence that a potassium deficiency can cause the cells to fill with water leading to an overall edema in the body. It’s possible that edema of the brain cells from potassium deficiency may be involved in chronic headaches. It’s also possible that potassium deficiency is responsible for the rapid increase in body weight seen in thyroid patients. This increase in body weight seems to occur despite calorie restriction and may be the result of swelling of all the body’s cells with water.

Indications of potassium deficiency include symptoms such as muscle weakness, which is a condition reported by many thyroid patients.

You will also see below that eating licorice can deplete potassium with possible fatal consequences. I would strongly urge anyone with thyroid disease to not eat licorice.

For these reasons I think studying potassium is critically important to understanding thyroid physiology.”